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SPOTLIGHT SERIES

Climate Displacement

23.9 million people migrated due to climate and weather-related disasters in 2019. Droughts, hurricanes, floods and sea level rise are all forcing people to move, right now. As the impacts of climate change worsen, more and more people will need to move, both within their own countries and across borders.

 

Many people, particularly governments in developed countries, are reluctant to engage with this issue. And the legal frameworks set up to assist asylum seekers are not suited to dealing with climate-related migration.

This spotlight series will examine how climate is reshaping patterns of migration, and join the dots between climate change and migration. We’ll get to grips with what’s going on, what the problems are, and what can be done to support and protect people who are displaced from their homes by the changing climate.

 

22nd April is Earth Day, and it marks 5 years since the Paris Climate Agreement. Action is being taken to mitigate, and adapt to, the future effects of climate change - but is it enough? In a series of blogs and webinars, we’ll reflect on the current situation facing millions across the world, forced to leave their homes due to the impacts of climate change, and explore what needs to change.

The collection of the articles was coordinated by our Climate Displacement Coordinator Annie Mellor.

CLIMATE CHANGE-RELATED MIGRATION AND GENDER-SPECIFIC CONSEQUENCES.

ADDRESSING THE LEGAL GAP.

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​The article​​ focuses on the definition of climate change-related migration and the specific consequences for women and girls; it examines the existing tools for legal protection of international migrants underlining the lack of specific instruments to provide legal protection to environmental migrants. The final section concludes the paper addressing the urgent need for developing best practices and establishing effective and specific legal instruments.

Veronica is a passionate jurist with a wide-ranging experience in the field of international migrations and a special qualification in dealing with vulnerable and forced migrants, including asylum seekers, victims of trafficking and victims of torture. In her professional history, she had the chance to work with both local NGOs and international organizations including UNHCR, IOM, and EASO. Her work experience enabled her to combine theoretical and practical knowledge of most relevant aspects connected with international migrations.

CLIMATE CHANGE DISPLACEMENT AND WOMEN:

VICTIMS OF NATURE OR PIONEERS FOR CHANGE?

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The article explores the overlap between climate change and the displacement of women, analysing the structural gender disparities impacted by both migration and climate change. The author also brings up alternative movements such as ecofeminism, which fights for a restructuring of climate change provisions. 

Anna Sofia Bregstein has an undergraduate degree in law from Emmanuel College, the University of Cambridge, and is currently studying for a postgraduate degree in Public International Law at the London School of Economics and Political Sciences. She has always had an avid interest in migration and asylum law, having collaborated with a number of immigration charities on research projects in the past, and hopes to pursue a career in migrant protection and climate change displacement.